BIS 261 DeVry All Week iLab

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BIS 261 DeVry All Week iLab

BIS261

BIS 261 DeVry Week 1 iLab Latest

Scenario and Summary

Acme Medical Data Storage LLC offers consumers a service that allows them to store their personal medical data on the Internet, for fast and easy retrieval by doctors or other healthcare personnel in the event of a medical emergency. Acme provides a website in which customers can set up an account and enter or update their medical information. On receipt of a signed authorization form, Acme will obtain a copy of a customer’s medical file from the customer’s personal physician, and scan the information into Acme’s database. Acme provides customers with wallet cards and medical ID bracelets telling healthcare personnel how to access the customer’s information online if needed, even if the customer is unconscious or otherwise unable to communicate. Acme charges customers $25 per month for this service, billed automatically to a credit card.

Acme was founded five years ago by Dr. Stanley Livingston, an entrepreneurial physician, and Bill Doors, a talented young computer programmer. The company has grown rapidly and now earns about $10 million in annual revenue. Stanley is President and Chief Executive Officer (CEO), and Bill serves as Chief Operating Officer (COO) and Chief Information Officer (CIO). Bill and Stanley want to continue to grow the company quickly, expand into related services, and take the company public within five more years.

Acme’s Information Systems (IS) staff includes one manager, two systems analysts, five software engineers, two system administrators, one database administrator, two network engineers, and two technicians. The IS group is responsible for the medical records database, the company website, the customer billing system, the company’s internal Local Area Network (LAN), and standard internal business systems for accounting, purchasing, human resources management, and marketing/business intelligence.

Since Acme is a Web-based company that is growing rapidly, the IS staff makes frequent updates and enhancements to its website and medical database to improve performance and offer new features. For example, the company is currently working on an upgrade to allow digitizing and storing x-rays and other medical images. Bill and Stanley both believe that the company must upgrade its technology rapidly to stay ahead of larger, better-funded competitors like Microsoft and Google, both of whom are rumored to be entering the field.

Acme deals with sensitive health-related records; therefore, the company is subject to extensive laws and regulations concerning privacy, security, and information accuracy. Its credit-card billing operation must also comply with numerous financial regulations imposed by government and the major credit-card companies.

Up until now, Acme has not used a formal System Development Life Cycle (SDLC). However, Bill believes that it is time to adopt one, as the IS group has grown to the point where informal methods no longer work well. Bill has asked you, Acme’s newest systems analyst, to investigate how well one particular SDLC model that he has in mind, would work for Acme.

Upon completing this lab, you will be able to:

  • Describe a selected System Development Life Cycle (SDLC) model in terms of its major phases, characteristics, advantages, and disadvantages;
  • Examine the fit between a selected SDLC model and the characteristics of a particular organization; and
  • Examine the fit between a selected SDLC model and the characteristics of a particular project.

Necessary materials:

All materials marked with * are already installed in your lab environment.

  • Background information (Scenario/Summary section above)
  • Template for memo (BIS261_W1_iLab_Template.docx; download from iLab Files folder in Doc Sharing)
  • Microsoft Word* for writing the memo

Deliverables

You will deliver a memo to the CIO, in a Word document.

Grading rubric:

Item Percentage
Description of the SDLC model 20%
Favorable factors 40%
Unfavorable factors 40%
  100%

 

iLab Steps

STEP 1: Review background information

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Review the case study on Acme Medical Data Storage LLC, given in the Scenario/Summary section above, paying careful attention to the characteristics of the company and its IS projects.

NOTE: This is an individual, not a team, iLab.

In your review, make notes specifying how you would rate the following characteristics of the company and project. These notes will not be turned in, but you will use them in conducting your analysis in Step 2 and preparing your memo in Step 3.

  1. Is the project technology extremely stable, moderately stable, or experimental?
  2. At the start of the project, are the project requirements well known, partially known, or mostly unknown (i.e., experimental)?
  3. Is the project domain heavily regulated, moderately regulated, or lightly regulated by government or other outside agencies?
  4. Is the size of the organization large, mid-sized, or small?
  5. Is the organizational culture bureaucratic, mixed, or entrepreneurial?
  6. Is the organization’s competitive environment slow-paced, moderately paced, or fast-paced?

 

STEP 2: Analyze SDLC suitability

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Based on the information given in the case study, analyze the suitability of a specific Software Development Life Cycle (SDLC) model for Acme Medical Data Storage LLC:

  • If the last digit of your DSI Number is 0, 1, 2, or 3, use the Waterfall SDLC;
  • If the last digit of your DSI Number is 4, 5, or 6, use the Unified Process; and
  • If the last digit of your DSI Number is 7, 8, or 9, use an agile SDLC (Scrum or XP).

In your analysis, examine your notes from your review of the project and organizational characteristics from Step 1, and make additional notes on the following points. These notes will not be turned in, but you will use them in preparing your memo in Step 3.

  1. Is the project technology good or a poor fit for this SDLC model? (Recall from your reading that good fits are stable technology and waterfall; moderately stable technology and UP; and experimental technology and agile.)
  2. Is the knowledge of project requirements a good or a poor fit for this SDLC model? (Recall from your reading that well-known requirements are a good fit for waterfall; partially known requirements are a good fit for UP; and mostly unknown requirements are a good fit for agile.)
  3. Is the degree of regulation of the project domain a good or a poor fit for this SDLC model? (Heavy regulation is a good fit for waterfall; moderate regulation, for UP; and light regulation for agile.)
  4. Is the size of the organization a good or a poor fit for this SDLC model? (Good fits, generally, are large organizations and waterfall; mid size organizations and UP; and small organizations and agile.) Is the organizational culture a good or a poor fit for this SDLC model? (Good fits are bureaucratic organizations and waterfall; mixed organizations and UP; and entrepreneurial organizations and agile.)
  5. Is the organization’s competitive environment a good or a poor fit for this SDLC model? (Good fits are slow-paced and waterfall; moderately paced and UP; and fast-paced and agile).

 

STEP 3: Write memo to Bill

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Write a one-to-two page memo to CIO, Bill Doors, by doing the following steps.

  1. Download the BIS261_W1_iLab_Template.docx template file from the iLab Files folder in Doc Sharing.
  2. In the memo header, enter your name in the From field; enter the current date in the Date field.
  3. In the Introduction section, fill in the SDLC model that you are writing about in the blank (waterfall, Unified Process, or agile).
  4. In the Description of the SDLC Model section, briefly describe the SDLC model that you are writing about in the memo. Refer to any reading assignment in the textbook and to the Lecture for information about this SDLC model, then describe it in your own words; don’t copy the description word for word from the textbook, the Lecture, or another source.
  5. In the Pros for this SDLC Model section, list and briefly explain the factors that are favorable toward Acme adopting this SDLC model. These should be chosen from the factors that you identified as good fits for the SDLC model in your analysis in Step 2. You should write about at least one, but no more than three, favorable factors. If you identified more than three factors as good fits for the SDLC model, choose what you believe are the three most important ones to include in your memo.
  6. In the Cons for this SDLC Model section, list and briefly explain the factors that are unfavorable toward Acme adopting this SDLC model. They should be chosen from the factors that you identified as poor fits for the SDLC model in your analysis in Step 2. You should write about at least one, but no more than three, unfavorable factors. If you identified more than three factors as poor fits for the SDLC model, choose what you believe are the three most important ones to include in your memo.

In your explanation of the favorable and unfavorable factors, refer to specific characteristics of Acme’s organization and its projects that impact the SDLC model. You must make your analysis specific to Acme and its projects. Do not just write about the pros and cons of your SDLC model in general!

Be sure to cite any sources that you use, using the citation style given in the Syllabus.

STEP 4: Save and submit

.equella.ecollege.com/file/e4b3d46c-b90a-498a-bd08-60c15f6027dd/1/BIS261_W1_iLab.html#top”>Back to Top Save your memo as a Microsoft Word file using the following naming convention: LastName_w1_ilab.docx.

 

BIS 261 DeVry Week 2 iLab Latest

Scenario and Summary

You are a business analyst working for a small business that is considering a project to implement a Customer Relationship Management (CRM) system for use by field sales personnel. The system will use the ACT! software application from Sage Software, Inc. Management has asked you to prepare a preliminary economic feasibility analysis for this proposed project.

The company has nine field sales representatives and one sales manager. The sales representatives and the manager already have desktop computers and Blackberry smartphones with cellular data plans, so these items do not have to be considered in your analysis.

The project requires the purchase of the following:

Ten copies of the latest version of the Sage ACT! Premium software application (one copy for each of the nine field sales representatives plus an additional copy for the sales manager).

Installation of the software on all 10 desktop PCs will take a computer technician from the company’s internal IT department two hours to complete. The computer technician earns $20/hour.

All users will attend a one-day (i.e., eight-hour) training class on the ACT! Premium software provided by Real World Training. The cost for the training class is $800 (this is for the entire class, not per person).

After the system is in operation, the company expects to purchase subscriptions to the ACT! Mobile Live service to allow the sales representatives to access their ACT! data through their Blackberry smartphones. A subscription will be required for each of the nine sales representatives (but not for the manager). Each subscription costs $120 per year.

Benefits expected from the system include:

Earnings from increased sales: $1,500 per year; and

Cost savings by avoiding hiring a part-time administrative assistant for the sales manager: $2,500 per year.

The project has a five-year time horizon and the company uses a discount rate of 10%.

Upon completing this lab, you will be able to:

Research and prepare a basic economic feasibility analysis spreadsheet for a project, and interpret the results.

Necessary materials:

All materials marked with * are already installed in your lab environment.

Background information (Scenario/Summary section above)

Economic Feasibility Analysis workbook (BIS261_W2_iLab_Template.xlsx; download from iLab Files folder in Doc Sharing)

Microsoft Excel* for performing the feasibility analysis

Deliverables

Submit your completed Economic Feasibility Assessment workbook with price quotations, feasibility analysis, and conclusions.

Grading rubric:

Item Percentage
Quotations sheet 30%
Analysis sheet 40%
Conclusions sheet 30%
  100%

 

iLab Steps:

STEP 1: Read and analyze the business case

Carefully read the Scenario/Summary given above and identify the benefits, one-time costs, and recurring costs associated with this proposed project. In your review, make notes on each of the following. These notes will not be turned in, but you will use them in completing the remaining steps in this lab.

  • What are the benefits that the company will obtain for each year that the system is in operation?
  • What are the one-time costs that the company must pay before putting the new system into operation?
  • What are the recurring costs that the company must pay each year that the system is in operation?

 

STEP 2: Download and open Economic Feasibility Analysis workbook template

Download the file BIS261_W2_iLab_Template.xlsx from the iLab Files area of Doc Sharing, and open it in Microsoft Excel. You will use this Excel workbook to record the results of your research, perform your economic feasibility analysis, and document your conclusions.

STEP 3: Research costs

Select a vendor for the application software needed for the project and determine the costs associated with purchasing this software.

Do research to identify vendors who supply this application software and their pricing. You may want to do research on the Internet (for example, on the website of the software publisher and other ecommerce sites that sell business software). You may also consider checking with local retailers who sell business software.

Select a specific vendor to use for a price quotation. You may select the vendor with the lowest price, or you may choose to select a higher-priced vendor if you decide that other factors (such as reliability or convenience) justify the higher cost.

In the One-Time Costs section of the Quotes worksheet, record the name of the software application under Product or Service. Record a description of the application (including the specific version) under Description. Record the vendor that you selected under Vendor. Record the vendor’s price per copy under Unit Cost. Record the number of copies needed for the project under Quantity.

Notice that a formula in the worksheet automatically calculates the Extended Cost.

STEP 4: Record additional cost and benefit line items

At the top of the worksheet, enter your name for Prepared By and the current date for Date.

In the Benefits section of the worksheet, for each expected benefit of the project, enter the Benefit Item, How Determined, and the Annual Value. If the annual value of a benefit item was given in the Scenario/Summary, enter Given in scenario in the How Determined column. If you need to perform any research or calculations to determine the Annual Value, use the How Determined column to briefly describe what you did.

In the One-Time Costs section of the worksheet, for each additional one-time cost item for the project, enter the Product or Service, Description, Vendor, Unit Cost, and Quantity (using the rows below the entry for application software that you made in Step 3). If a service is provided by a company employee rather than purchased from an outside vendor, enter In-house in the Vendor column.

In the Recurring Costs section of the worksheet, for each recurring cost associated with the project, enter the Cost Item, How Determined, and Annual Value. If the annual value of a cost item was given in the Scenario/Summary, enter Given in scenario in the How Determined column. If you needed to perform any research or calculations to determine the Annual Value, use the How Determined column to briefly describe what you did.

Notice that formulas in the worksheet automatically calculate the totals for each section.

STEP 5: Perform the Economic Feasibility Analysis

Enter values in the blue-shaded cells in the Analysis worksheet to calculate the Net Present Value (NPV), Return on Investment (ROI), and break-even point for the project, as follows.

Enter a descriptive name for the project in the cell marked [Enter Project Name Here].

Enter the discount rate for the project (the discount rate is given in the Scenario/Summary).

Take the Total Annual Value of Benefits from the Quotes worksheet and, on the Analysis worksheet, enter this value in the Net Economic Benefit row for each year that the project will be in operation (Year 1 through Year 5). Be sure to enter benefit values as positive numbers.

Take the Total of One-Time Costs from the Quotes worksheet and, on the Analysis worksheet, enter this value in the One-Time COSTS row under Year 0. Be sure to enter this cost value as a negative number.

Take the Total Annual Value of Recurring Costs from the Quotes worksheet and, on the Analysis worksheet, enter this value in the Recurring Costs row for each year that the project will be in operation (Year 1 through Year 5). Be sure to enter cost values as negative numbers.

Notice that formulas in the worksheet automatically calculate the Overall NPV, Overall ROI, and break-even point for the project.

STEP 6: Document conclusions

On the Conclusions worksheet, write a brief memo (three-to-five paragraphs) to your manager, including the following:

  1. Enter your name after FROM: and the current date after DATE:;
  2. Summarize your research findings and the results of your feasibility analysis in narrative form (one or two paragraphs);
  3. State your own interpretation of these results–what they mean in your own words (one or two paragraphs); and
  4. Finish with a clear statement of your opinion on whether or not the project is economically feasible for the company, and why (one paragraph).

STEP 7: Save and submit

Save your completed workbook as a Microsoft Excel file using the following naming convention: LastName_w2_ilab.xlsx.

 

BIS 261 DeVry Week 3 iLab Latest

Scenario and Summary

OfficeFix, Inc. provides onsite office equipment repair services. Customers call a toll-free number or visit a website to request a service call. OfficeFix dispatches a technician to the customer’s location within two hours to perform the needed repairs. OfficeFix can repair most popular makes and models of office equipment, including photocopiers, scanners, fax machines, desktop computers, and printers.

OfficeFix’s customer base has been growing rapidly, and the company has been expanding the number of makes and models of equipment that can be serviced. As a result, it has become difficult for service technicians to carry printed repair manuals for all of the different types of equipment, and time-consuming for them to find the right manual and service procedure. OfficeFix has decided to address these problems by creating a Mobile Service Knowledge Base system that will allow service technicians to call up repair procedures on handheld devices, eliminating the need for the paper manuals.

You are a business analyst for OfficeFix. You have been assigned to write the requirements specification document for the Mobile Service Knowledge Base system.

While you were busy on a different project, another analyst met with OfficeFix’s Field Service Manager and interviewed him regarding the project. You have been provided with a transcript of that interview. Based on this transcript, your manager has asked you to prepare a preliminary list of requirements for the project. This list will be expanded and revised as you gather requirements from other sources, but it will serve as a starting point for the project.

  • Upon completing this lab, you will be able to:
  • Extract business requirements from customer interviews,
  • Document business requirements so that they are objective, measurable, and testable, and
  • Identify requirements in multiple categories.

Necessary materials:

All materials marked with * are already installed in your lab environment.

Background information (Scenario/Summary section above)

Transcript of interview with Field Service Manager

(BIS261_W3_iLab_Transcript.docx; download from iLab files folder in Doc Sharing)

Template for requirements list (BIS261_W3_iLab_Template.docx; download from iLab files folder in Doc Sharing)

Microsoft Word* for writing the requirements

Deliverables

Prepare a list of business requirements for the Mobile Service Knowledge Base system.

Grading rubric:

Item Percentage
Each requirement is individually numbered. 10%
Each requirement is expressed in a clear and concise format, preferably as a single sentence. 20%
Requirements are stated so as to be objective, measurable, and testable. 20%
Requirements accurately reflect customer needs as expressed in the interview transcript. 20%
At least 10 requirements are provided. 20%
At least one requirement is provided in each of the following categories:

functional, technical, performance, usability, reliability, and security.

10%
  100%

 

iLab Steps

STEP 1: Review background information and interview transcript

Review the available information about the OfficeFix Mobile Service Knowledge Base system.

Review the Scenario/Summary section above.

Download and review the interview transcript provided in the BIS261_W3_iLab_Transcript.docx file in the iLab Files folder in Doc Sharing.

STEP 2: Download and open Economic Feasibility Analysis workbook template

Based on the information that you reviewed in Step 1, write at least 10 specific statements of business requirements for the Mobile Service Knowledge Base system. Make sure that each requirement statement expresses a single requirement in a way that is objective, measurable, and testable.

Download the file BIS261_W3_iLab_Template.docx from the iLab Files folder in Doc Sharing.

In the Functional Requirements section, write at least one functional requirement for the system. (Each functional requirement states an activity or process that the system must perform.) In the Rqmt. No. column, assign each functional requirement a unique number starting with FR- such as FR-001, FR-002, and so on.

In the Technical Requirements section, write at least one technical requirement for the system. (Each technical requirement states a characteristic that the system must have because of the organization’s technological environment.) In the Rqmt. No. column, assign each technical requirement a unique number starting with TR-, such as TR-001, TR-002, and so on.

In the Performance Requirements section, write at least one performance requirement for the system. (Performance requirements deal with the speed, capacity, response time, or throughput of the system.) In the Rqmt. No. column, assign each performance requirement a unique number starting with PR-, such as PR-001, PR-002, and so on.

In the Usability Requirements section, write at least one usability requirement for the system. (Usability requirements are those that make the system easier to work with for users.) In the Rqmt. No. column, assign each usability requirement a unique number starting with UR-, such as UR-001, UR-002, and so on.

In the Reliability Requirements section, write at least one reliability requirement for the system. (Reliability requirements specify how dependable the system must be, and how it should handle errors, failures, and outages.) In the Rqmt. No. column, assign each reliability requirement a unique number starting with RR-, such as RR-001, RR-002, and so on.

In the Security Requirements section, write at least one security requirement for the system. (Security requirements deal with how user access to information is controlled.) In the Rqmt. No. column, assign each security requirement a unique number starting with SR-, such as SR-001, SR-002, and so on.

NOTE: You must write at least 10 requirements in total, with at least one in each category. To write 10 total requirements, you will need to write more than one requirement in some categories.

STEP 3: Save and submit

Save your requirements list as a Microsoft Word file using the following naming convention: LastName_w3_ilab.docx.

 

BIS 261 DeVry Week 4 iLab Latest

Joint Application Development (JAD) Session

iLab Overview

Scenario/Summary

Acme Jewelry Company is a successful Midwestern retailer of medium-priced items. It currently has stores in six metropolitan areas and operates under a brick-and-mortar business model. Management has committed itself to enhancing its marketing channels to include an Internet-based distribution channel to the public. This e-commerce application is their first endeavor into Web-based information systems.

The company has the following organization structure.

View Transcript Here

Facts about the current business:

  1. All stores are located in large shopping malls and carry the same merchandise.
  2. Jewelry lines include women’s lines for necklaces, earrings, and bracelets in the range of the $50 – $200 price range.
  3. Approximately 500 items are available for sale in each retail location.
  4. A central warehouse is maintained in one of the larger cities and supplies all of the retail stores.

Facts about the project:

  1. The Senior Business Systems Analyst in the Information Systems Department has been assigned to manage the requirements discovery phase of this project.
  2. Time frames of the project are very tight because management wants the system implemented in time for the Christmas holiday season. It is currently April and a due date of October 1st has been requested.
  3. Your initial assignment is for the key system owners and users – the Chief Retail Officer (CRO), Chief Financial Officer (CFO), Chief Merchandising Officer (CMO), and Chief Information Officer (CIO) — to gather an initial set of high-level business requirements. The Senior Business Systems Analyst will coordinate and facilitate a Joint Application Development (JAD) meeting to accomplish this task.
  4. Because all of the key stakeholders are extremely busy and frequently travel on business, it is not feasible for them to meet in person. Therefore, the meeting will be coordinated using e-mail, a SharePoint site, and will be held online in a Web conferencing environment.
  5. Because the time of all of the key stakeholders is extremely valuable, the JAD meeting itself will be limited to one hour maximum.
  6. The President/CEO may or may not attend the JAD meeting, depending on his or her other commitments.

You will be assigned to play the role of one of the participants in this JAD meeting. You should participate actively in the pre-meeting activities (scheduling and agenda preparation) and the meeting itself, all the while keeping in character with your assigned role.

All of the above information is known to all participants. In addition, you will receive a Cast of Characters with additional public information about all of the characters, and a Role Sheet with additional background on your character and some private information known only by you. It is up to you whether, when, and how to share any or all of your private information with others on your team.

Upon completing this lab, you will be able to:

  • Learn how to facilitate and elicit requirements for a business information system from a group of diverse users;
  • Also experience the conflict that may exist between users who have their own specialized need for the planned information system;
  • Practice the tasks associated with planning and conducting a meeting, including scheduling, preparing, and distributing an agenda by using an electronic collaboration support system (SharePoint); and
  • Learn and practice communication techniques and mechanical skills for meeting with a geographically dispersed group in a Web conferencing environment.

Necessary materials: All materials marked with * are already installed in your lab environment.

  • Background information (Scenario/Summary section above)
  • Microsoft Word* for writing the JAD meeting invitation memo
  • Microsoft SharePoint site* for scheduling meeting and creating meeting agenda
  • Web conferencing application* for conducting and recording the JAD meeting
  • Cast of Characters (BIS261_W4_iLab_Cast.docx; download from iLab filesfolder in Doc Sharing)
  • Role Sheet for your assigned role (BIS261_W4_iLab_Role_xxx.docx; download fromRole:xxxfolder in Doc Sharing, where xxx = the role assigned to you by your instructor for this lab)

Deliverables

Submit your assignment to the Dropbox, located at the top of this page. For instructions on how to use the Dropbox, read these step-by-step instructions.

(See the Syllabus section “Due Dates for Assignments & Exams” for due dates.)

  • JAD meeting invitation memo (Word document) posted to team SharePoint site and submitted to the weekly iLab Dropbox.
  • JAD meeting agenda on team SharePoint site, with a screenshot pasted in a Word document and submitted to the weekly iLab Dropbox.
  • Recorded JAD meeting in ClassLive Pro.

Grading Rubric:

JAD meeting invitation memo (one score for the team) 20%
JAD meeting agenda (one score for the team) 30%
Demonstration of effective facilitation/group participation skills during meeting (assessed from recording). Each team member receives an individual score for this item based on his or her own participation in the recorded JAD session. Any team member who does not participate in the JAD session will receive a zero for this item. 50%
  100%

 

Required Software Microsoft Office: Word

Use a personal copy or access the software at https://lab.devry.edu.

All Steps

Lab Steps STEP 1: Read and analyze background information

  1. Carefully read the Scenario/Summary above and identify the key system owners and users, and key issues affecting the project.
  2. Download and read the Cast of Characters document from the iLab Filesarea of Doc Sharing for more information about each of the stakeholders.
  3. After you have been assigned a role in this scenario by the instructor, go to the Doc Sharing tab on our course site, and use the drop-down list to select the area for your assigned role. Download your Role Sheet and read it carefully. Consider how your character’s background and goals relate to the project.

STEP 2: Schedule JAD meeting

  1. Log in to the Citrix iLab. (For help with logging in, see the iLab page under Course Home.)
  2. On the main iLab applications menu, click the icon labeledBIS261 iLabs SharePoint Siteto go to the SharePoint site for BIS261.
  3. Click the link for this section of BIS261 to go to your course section, SharePoint site. Links to course section, SharePoint sites are on the right side of the page. For online courses, the link to your course section will be in the form BIS261sxxxyyz, where s = the section letter (A, B, C, etc.), xxx = the semester (SPR, SUM, or FAL), yy = the year, and z = the session (A or B). For example, the link to the online section A for Summer 2011 Session B would be BIS261ASUM11B. For campus courses, the link is preceded by a three-letter campus identifier. For example, the link to the Pomona campus section A for Summer 2011 Session B would be POMBIS261ASUM11B.
  4. On the main page of your course section, SharePoint site, click the link to go to the SharePoint site for your team. Links to the team sites are on the left side of the page. Each link ends with the team letter (_A, _B, and so on). Your team assignment will be provided to you by your professor. Contact your professor if you are not sure of your team assignment.
  5. On your team SharePoint site, edit your own entry in the Attendees list to indicate the days and times when you are available to meet. To do so, click on the Edit icon beside your name; enter the dates and times when you are available in the Comments field; and click OK.
  6. After all team members have posted their schedules, the team member assigned the Business Systems Analyst role should determine a time when all members are available, and schedule the meeting on the calendar on the section SharePoint site. If there is no time when all members are available, some negotiation by e-mail or telephone may be necessary to determine a mutually agreeable time.

To schedule the meeting on the SharePoint calendar, do the following:

  • On your course section, SharePoint site (not your team site), under Calendar on the right side of the page, click Add new event;
  • Enter a title, start time, and end time for your meeting, and click OK;
  • Use U.S. Mountain time zone for all times; and
  • Ensure that your meeting does not conflict with a meeting already scheduled by another team.

TIP: If necessary, review the tutorial “Using Microsoft SharePoint for Meetings and Documents” at the end of the Week 4 Lecture for a demonstration of accessing your course section and team SharePoint sites, editing your entry in the Attendees list, and adding an event to the calendar.

STEP 3: Prepare and distribute meeting invitation

The team member assigned the Business Systems Analyst role should prepare and distribute a meeting invitation. Follow the steps below.

Open a blank Word document and compose a meeting invitation. The meeting invitation should state the specific purpose of the meeting, the date, time, and expected duration; how to join the meeting using the designated Web conferencing application; and how participants should prepare for the meeting. Save the meeting invitation by using the filename W4_iLab_TeamX.docx, where x = your team letter.

  1. E-mail the meeting invitation to all members of your team and the professor.
  2. Upload a copy of the meeting invitation to the document library on your team SharePoint site. To do so:
  • On the home page for your team SharePoint site, under Document Library, click Add new document;
  • Click the Browse button;
  • Navigate to the location where you saved the meeting invitation document, select it, and click Open. (Remember that when you are working on the iLab server, drives on your local computer will appear with a dollar sign after the drive letter; e.g. F$ for drive F: ); and
  • Click OK to upload the file.

TIP: If necessary, review the tutorial “Using Microsoft SharePoint for Meetings and Documents ” at the end of the Week 4 Lecture for a demonstration of uploading a file to the Document Library.

STEP 4: Prepare meeting agenda

All team members should contribute to formulating an agenda for the meeting by adding, editing, commenting on, or deleting agenda items on the team SharePoint site. To do so, go to your team SharePoint site’s home page and use the following procedures:

  1. To add a new agenda item: Under Agenda, click on Add new item. Enter the Subject of your agenda item and click OK;
  2. To edit an agenda item: Hover the cursor over the item that you wish to edit. A drop-down arrow will appear beside the item. Click this drop-down arrow and select Edit Item. Make any desired changes to the item and click OK;
  3. To comment on an agenda item: Use the procedure described in Step b above to edit the item, and add your comments to the Notes box; and
  4. To delete an agenda item: Hover the cursor over the item that you wish to edit. A drop-down arrow will appear beside the item. Click this drop-down arrow and select Delete Item.

STEP 5: Conduct the Joint Application Development Session

At the scheduled time, use the iConnect Meeting Web conferencing application to conduct a 45-60 minute JAD session with your team.

Click to open the Team Area tab located below Week 8. You and your team members need to review the“iConnect Meeting”information at the bottom of the page. This information will tell you how to schedule a meeting, join a meeting, work with audio, and share presentations and desktop.

Image Description

Use the features of iConnect Meeting ClassLive Pro to conduct your JAD meeting, as follows:

  1. Communicate using the text chat feature.
  2. Communicate using audio. Each team member must have a microphone with audio capabilities
  3. Use the whiteboard
  4. Share a document and Share desktop

Conduct your JAD session:

  1. Select your assigned Team Meeting area under the Team Area tab. Be sure you and your team members review the “iConnect Meeting” information located on the TEAM AREA tab.
  2. Be sure you RECORD your iConnect JAD Session.
  3. Assign one team member to act as moderator and another to act as recorder (scribe).
  4. During your JAD session, agree on at least ten (10) pertinent, high-level business requirements for the project. The team member assigned to act as the recorder for the meeting should document the meeting minutes and the agreed list of requirements in a Word file. The minutes and list of requirements will be used in the next iLab.
  5. All team members should participate fully in the meeting, using the communication and facilitation skills learned during the week. Team members should act in character for their assigned roles, but should also work to support the team as a whole.
  6. When finished, Stop the iConnect Recording and close the session.

STEP 6: Save and submit

The team member assigned the role of Business Systems Analyst should submit copies of the meeting invitation and final meeting agenda to the iLab Dropbox on the course site (in addition to the copies posted on the team SharePoint site). To do so:

  1. Open theW4_iLab_TeamX.docxfile containing the meeting invitation that you created in Step 3;
  2. Go to the home page of your team area on the SharePoint site. Press the key to capture an image of the page, including the final Agenda. Paste this image at the end of the meeting invitation file; and
  3. Save the file and submit it to the Dropbox for this week’s iLab assignment. In the comments box of your Dropbox submission, state the date and time of your JAD session. If you used practice time at the start, also state at what time in the session you began the formal JAD meeting.

Submit your assignment to the Dropbox, located at the top of this page. For instructions on how to use the Dropbox, read these step-by-step instructions.

 

BIS 261 DeVry Week 6 iLab Latest

Scenario and Summary

Acme Video Games is a video game rental company that rents video games for the major gaming consoles (Sony PlayStation, Nintendo Wii, and Xbox 360). Acme has recently decided to expand its distribution by renting games through automated vending machines, similar to the way that Redbox rents DVDs. You have been hired by Acme as a business analyst to help develop the software for the new vending machines.

Each Acme vending machine will be stocked with a selection of popular video games. The machine will have a touchscreen, a credit-card swipe reader, a slot for dispensing rented games, and a second slot for returning games. Each machine is connected to the Internet.

To begin using the machine, a customer touches a button on the screen to select one of two options, Rent a Game or Return a Game.

If the customer chooses Rent a Game, he or she selects the desired game from a list displayed on the screen, swipes a valid credit card, enters his or her zip code, and enters an e-mail address. The vending machine contacts Acme’s bank over its Internet connection and charges the customer’s credit card for a one-night rental fee. If the charge is accepted by the bank, the bank returns an authorization code to the machine. The machine then dispenses the game to the customer and e-mails a receipt to the customer’s e-mail address. The machine transmits a record of the rental, including the customer’s information and the unique ID number of the game disc that was dispensed, to a central computer system at Acme’s headquarters over its Internet connection.

If the customer chooses Return a Game, the screen prompts the customer to insert the game into the return slot. The machine reads the game disc’s ID number from a bar code on the disc, and transmits it to the central computer system at Acme headquarters over its Internet connection. The central computer returns the date and time of the rental and the customer’s information. If the customer kept the game for more than one night, the machine sends an additional rental charge to Acme’s bank over its Internet connection, and receives an authorization code from the bank if the charge was accepted. The machine e-mails a receipt for the returned game to the customer’s e-mail address. The additional rental charges, if any, are noted on this receipt.

Upon completing this lab, you will be able to:

  • Create a use case diagram for a simple system or subsystem;
  • Write a use case description for a selected use case, including a main success scenario and extensions;
  • Identify the principal classes involved in implementing a use case;
  • Create a domain model class diagram showing the classes involved in a use case, their attributes, and their relationships, but not detailed methods.

Necessary materials: All materials marked with * are already installed in your lab environment.

  • Background information (Scenario/Summary section above)
  • Template for use case description (BIS261_W6_iLab_Template.docx; download from iLab Files folder in Doc Sharing)
  • Microsoft Visio* for creating use case diagram and class diagram
  • Microsoft Word* for creating use case description

Deliverables

You will submit two files in order to complete this lab:

  • Use case diagram for Acme video game vending machine (page 1 of Visio file);
  • A Word file containing a use case description for the Rent a Game use case (Word file); and
  • A Visio file containing two pages: a use case diagram for the Acme vending machine (page 1 noted above), and a domain model class diagram for the Rent a Game use case (page 2).

Grading rubric:

Item Percentage
Use case diagram 30%
Use case description 40%
Conceptual class diagram 30%
  100%

 

iLab Steps

 STEP 1: Review background information

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Review the information on Acme’s video game vending machine project given in the Scenario/Summary. This brief description specifies the main requirements for the project. In completing the remaining steps of this iLab, you may need to make reasonable assumptions about additional requirements not stated explicitly in the Scenario/Summary.

As you review the Scenario/Summary, make notes of your answers to the following questions. These notes will not be turned in, but you will use them in completing the remaining steps in this iLab.

  1. What are the use cases–the major activities that the system performs in response to user requests?
  2. What are the actors–people who use the system, or other external systems with which this system interacts? TIP: The scope of the system” for your analysis should be only the vending machine itself. Any persons or other systems with which the vending machine interacts, including other systems that it communicates with over a network, should be considered as actors.
  3. What are the classes–the categories of persons, places, things, or events that need to be represented in the system?

STEP 2: Draw a use case diagram

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Based on your answers to the questions in Step 1, use Microsoft Visio to draw a UML use case diagram for the Acme vending machine system. To do so:

  1. Log in to the Citrix iLab. (For help with logging in, see the iLab page under Course Home.)
  2. Open the Microsoft Office Applications folder and, from within that folder, launch Microsoft Visio.
  3. Under Template Categories, select Software and Database. Under Featured Templates, select the UML Model Diagram template. Click the Create button. .equella.ecollege.com/file/5e651ec8-89f7-44f0-95d4-d1b272ff2a8b/1/images–w6_ilab_01.gif”>
  4. Using the drop-down list in the toolbar, set the zoom level to 100%.
  5. In the Shapes toolbox, click the UML Use Case heading to expand it.
  6. Drag a system boundary rectangle from the Shapes toolbox and drop it in the approximate center of the diagram. While the system boundary rectangle is still selected, type Vending Machine” as the name of the system and click outside of the rectangle.
  7. For each actor that you identified in Step 1, drag an actor shape from the Shapes toolbox onto the diagram. After dropping each actor onto the diagram, type the name of the actor. The name will be displayed under the actor symbol. Position the actors outside of the system boundary rectangle.
  8. For each use case that you identified in Step 1, drag a use case shape from the Shapes toolbox and drop it on the diagram inside of the system boundary rectangle. To name each use case, right-click on the use case symbol and select Properties, as shown:

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In the UML Use Case Properties dialog, enter the name of the use case in the Name box and click OK.

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The use case name will be displayed inside of the use case oval.

  1. For each interaction between an actor and a use case, drag a Communicates line from the Shapes toolbox onto the diagram. Drag one endpoint of the Communicates line onto the actor, dropping it when you see a red outline appear around the actor symbol, as shown: .equella.ecollege.com/file/5e651ec8-89f7-44f0-95d4-d1b272ff2a8b/1/images–w6_ilab_04.gif”>

 

The red outline appears when Visio has attached the endpoint to the symbol. Drag the other endpoint of the Communicates line onto the use case, dropping it when you see a red outline appear around the use case symbol.

  1. To remove the unnecessary -End1 and -End2 labels, right-click on the Communicates line and select Shape Display Options, as shown:

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In the UML Shape Display Options dialog, under Suppress, check the boxes for First end and Second end. Also, near the bottom of the dialog, check the box labeled Apply to subsequently dropped UML shapes . . . , as shown:

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Click OK to close the dialog.

  1. If any use case on your diagram is included as a common subroutine of other use cases, drag a Uses arrow from the Shapes toolbox and drop it onto the diagram. Connect the arrowhead endpoint of the Uses arrow to the use case that is the common subroutine. Connect the other endpoint of the Uses arrow to the use case that uses the common subroutine.

 

The following shows a partially completed version of the use case diagram, with one actor and two use cases. Your completed diagram should include at least three use cases and at least three actors.

  1. Save your completed use case diagram by using the file name LastName_W6_iLab.vsd. Remember that when saving files within the Citrix iLab environment, your local computer’s disk drives will appear with a dollar sign after the drive letter (for example, the C: drive on your local computer will appear as C$).

TIP: Review the video tutorial Creating a Use Case Diagram in Microsoft Visio in the Week 6 Lecture for additional help with creating your use case diagram.

STEP 3: Write a use case description

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Write a fully developed use case description for the Rent a Game use case, as follows:

  1. Download and open the BIS261_W6_iLab_Template.docx file from the iLab Files folder in Doc Sharing;
  2. Enter your name after Created by. Enter the current date after Date;
  3. Note that the use case name, Rent a Game, has been filled in for you in the template;
  4. In the Scenario section, enter a one-sentence overview of what happens in this use case. This should be slightly more detailed and specific than the use case name;
  5. In the Triggering Event section, briefly describe what happens to initiate this use case;
  6. In the Brief Description section, summarize the steps that take place when this use case is performed. This should be more detailed than your one-sentence overview in the Scenario section, but not as detailed as the Flow of Events;
  7. In the Actors section, list the actors that take part in this use case. These are the actors that are connected to this use case by the Communicates lines in your use case diagram;
  8. In the Related Use Cases section, list other use cases, if any, that are connected to this one in the use case diagram. These include use cases that use this one, and use cases that are used by this one. If there are none, enter none;
  9. In the Stakeholders section, identify any parties with an interest in the outcome of this use case, other than the actors who directly participate in the use case. These might be, for example, other departments within the company that utilize data generated by this use case. If there are none, enter none;
  10. In the Preconditions section, describe the state of the system before the use case is performed;
  11. In the Post conditions section, describe the state of the system after the use case has been performed;
  12. In the Flow of Events section, list the specific steps involved in performing the normal or usual flow of events in the use case. Assign a sequential number (1, 2, 3, and so on) to each step. List steps performed by an actor in the Actor column, and steps performed by the system in the System column;
  13. In the Exception Conditions section, identify any errors or other unusual conditions that might occur while performing the use case, and describe what should happen if each one occurs. For each exception condition, identify the step number in the Flow of Events at which the exception condition might occur; and
  14. Save the completed use case description with the file name LastName_W6_iLab.docx.

STEP 4: Identify classes

.equella.ecollege.com/file/5e651ec8-89f7-44f0-95d4-d1b272ff2a8b/1/BIS261_W6_iLab.html#top”>Back to Top Analyze your use case description to identify the major classes that would be involved in implementing the Rent a Game use case. Remember that classes are indicated by important nouns in the use case description that represent persons, places, things, or events that the system must track or manipulate when performing the use case. To identify classes, do the following:

  1. Carefully read the Rent a Game use case description that you created in Step 3, and as you do so, make a list of the important nouns representing persons, places, things, or events that appear in the description.
  2. For each noun on your list, ask yourself whether the system needs to store information about or manipulate that person, place, thing, or event in order to perform the use case. For example, the noun button might appear in your use case description, but the system does not need to store information about the button, so you would not need to include a Button class in your list.
  3. For each noun on the list, ask yourself whether the noun represents an independent person, place, thing, or event needing its own class, or whether it may be an attribute of another person, place, thing, or event. For example, the noun, zip code might appear in your use case description, but the zip code is an attribute of the Customer class and does not need a class of its own.
  4. For each noun on the list, ask whether it is a synonym of another noun that also appears on the list. Only one class should be used to represent a person, place, thing, or event, even if it is sometimes referred to by different words. For example, you might have used the words customer and client in your use case description. If these both refer to the same person, then only one class named Customer should be used to represent both items.

STEP 5: Draw class diagram

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Based on your final list of classes from Step 4, draw a domain model class diagram showing the classes involved in the Rent a Game use case. Your diagram should include at least five classes, at least two attributes for each class, and class relationships with multiplicities. To create this diagram:

  1. If necessary, log in to the Citrix iLab, open the Microsoft Applications folder, launch Microsoft Visio, and open the LastName_W6_iLab.vsd file that you created in Step 2;
  2. Right-click on the sheet tab labeled Use Case-1 at the bottom of the window, and select Insert Page, as shown:

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  1. In the Page Setup dialog, enter Class Diagram-2 in the Name box as shown: .equella.ecollege.com/file/5e651ec8-89f7-44f0-95d4-d1b272ff2a8b/1/images–w6_ilab_09.gif”>

Click OK to close the dialog.

  1. Using the drop-down list in the toolbar, set the zoom level to 100%.
  2. In the Shapes toolbox, click the UML Static Structure heading to expand it.
  3. For each class that you identified in Step 4, drag a class symbol from the Shapes toolbox onto the diagram. After dropping each class onto the diagram, while the class is still selected, type the name of the class. The class name should appear in the top third of the class symbol. Click outside of the class shape to deselect it.
  4. Right-click on each class and select Properties. In the UML Class Properties dialog, under Categories on the left, select Attributes. In the Attributes grid on the right, click in the first blank cell in the Attribute column, enter the name of an attribute, and press Enter. You should enter at least two attributes for each class..equella.ecollege.com/file/5e651ec8-89f7-44f0-95d4-d1b272ff2a8b/1/images–w6_ilab_10.gif”>

Click OK to close the dialog after entering your attributes. You should see the attributes displayed in the middle third of the class symbol, as shown: .equella.ecollege.com/file/5e651ec8-89f7-44f0-95d4-d1b272ff2a8b/1/images–w6_ilab_11.gif”>

  1. For each relationship between two classes, drag a binary association line from the Shapes toolbox onto the diagram. Connect the endpoints of the binary association line to the related classes in the same way that you connected the endpoints of the Communicates lines to actors and use cases in Step 2.
  2. To remove the end labels from the binary association lines, right-click on the binary association line and select Shape Display Options. In the UML Shape Display Options dialog, under End options, uncheck the boxes for First end name and Second end name. Ensure that the box for End multiplicities is checked. Near the bottom of the dialog, check the box for Apply to subsequently dropped UML shapes . . . Click OK.

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  1. To designate multiplicities for each relationship, right-click on the binary association line and select Properties. In the UML Association Properties dialog, select Association under Categories on the left. In the Association Ends grid on the right, click on each cell in the Multiplicity column and use the drop-down list to select the desired multiplicity, as shown: .equella.ecollege.com/file/5e651ec8-89f7-44f0-95d4-d1b272ff2a8b/1/images–w6_ilab_13.gif”>

 

After setting the multiplicity for each end, click OK to close the dialog.

 

The following shows a partially completed class diagram with two classes, two attributes for each class, and a binary association between the classes with appropriate multiplicities. Your completed class diagram should include at least five classes, with at least two attributes per class and all necessary association lines and multiplicities.

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  1. Save your changes to the Visio file LastName_W6_iLab.vsd, which now contains your use case diagram on page 1 and your class diagram on page 2.

TIP: Review the video tutorial creating a Class Diagram with Microsoft Visio in the Week 6 Lecture for add