HRM 593 DeVry Complete Week Discussions Package

Downloading is very simple, you can download this Course here:

http://wiseamerican.us/product/hrm-593-devry-complete-week-discussions-package/

Or

Contact us at:

SUPPORT@WISEAMERICAN.US

HRM 593 DeVry Complete Week Discussions Package

HRM593

HRM 593 DeVry Complete Week Discussions Package

 

HRM 593 DeVry Week 1 Discussion

Employment-at-Will Exceptions and Liability (graded)

Review the 10 cases presented for consideration in Question 2 (letters a – j) of the Chapter-End Questions in Chapter 2 (pp. 80-81 of the eBook).

For your first post, prepare a detailed response for one of the ten scenarios, explaining your conclusion regarding whether the scenario constitutes a violation of public policy or a breach of a covenant of good faith and fair dealing. Support your conclusion with legal analysis and reasoning. Explain whether any of the scenarios give rise to potential employer liability and what steps should have been taken to avoid the exposure. Then, comment and expand on the posts of the other class members.

Your instructor will respond with more ideas for discussion throughout the week.

 

HRM 593 DeVry Week 2 Discussion

Recruitment of Employees (graded)

Let’s begin our discussion on recruitment by using a fact pattern from a litigated case. Cone Mills Corporation had several recruiting procedures that gave preferential treatment to applicants who either had family members or friends working for the company. One of these procedures was to give priority to applicants who had family members employed by the company. The other procedure entailed having an unwritten policy that walk-in applicants had to have renewed every two weeks. This created a situation where only those walk-in applicants who had friends or family in the company would renew their applications because they would be the only ones informed of the informal rule, which was not presented in any manual or policy. These recruiting procedures were challenged as being discriminatory towards blacks in general, especially black women, because the informal network responsible for recruiting new employees was unavailable to them. The company claimed that the procedures were not designated to be discriminatory, but rather, to create a loyal family atmosphere within the plant (Lea v. Cone Mills Corp., 3001 F. Supp. 97).

Should employers be able to recruit through employee referrals and word-of-mouth? Does the law allow for such a recruitment technique? What specific restrictions does Title VII place on an employer’s ability to recruit and hire? As part of this discussion, refer to the cases of EEOC v. Chicago Miniature Lamp Works and EEOC v. Consolidated Service System in Chapter 4. This section lists options that can be used to view responses.

 

HRM 593 DeVry Week 3 Discussion

Sexual Harassment and the Law (graded)

What have sexual harassment laws accomplished in the workplace? Have the advances in sexual harassment law resulted in women being denied meaningful access to senior management mentors, who are most often male? Does every civil rights gain in the workplace also carry with it an unintended cost?

 

HRM 593 DeVry Week 4 Discussion

Age Discrimination and the Workforce (graded)

Baby boomers typically possess more work experience and are older than the next generation. Does an employer have the right to refuse to hire candidates who are overqualified, such as baby boomers? Substantiate your response.

 

HRM 593 DeVry Week 5 Discussion

ADA Protections (graded)

On September 25, 2008, President Bush signed the ADA Amendments Act of 2008 (ADAAA) into law, overturning a series of decisions by the U.S. Supreme Court under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and expanding the scope of medical conditions protected by the law. What do these changes mean for employers and employees in conjunction with protection against discrimination based on disability in the workplace? What will employers need to do to comply?

 

HRM 593 DeVry Week 6 Discussion

FLSA (graded)

College sophomore, Suzy Smart, works part-time in the Handi Mart convenience store near campus. The store manager requires that each clerk arrives 15 minutes prior to the start of the shift so that the clerk going off-duty can review the sales figures and cash status with replacements before leaving. The clerk going off-duty punches the timecard after this review, but the incoming clerk is not allowed to punch in until the review is completed and they have agreed that the sales and cash figures are accurate. Sometimes, this exercise takes more than 15 minutes, and no matter how long it takes, the clerk coming on-duty may not punch the timecard and start earning wages until the process is completed.

Suzy, who completed a course on labor and employment law, realizes that the store manager is violating the FLSA by not allowing the incoming clerk to punch the time clock upon arrival. She brings this issue up with the store manager, who tells her that Handi Mart’s parent corporation does not allow the store to compensate two clerks for the same period of time, no matter how brief, since this is classified by the corporation as a single coverage store. Furthermore, he adds ominously, if Suzy complains to the Wage and Hour Division of the DOL, he will probably be forced by the company to lay Suzy off, along with other part-timers, and cover the store himself for the evening shifts. He states, “You may get everyone a few dollars in back pay, but you’ll also cost everybody their jobs. Remember, some of your co-workers are single parents who need this extra income to make ends meet.”

Has the store manager violated FLSA? Explain? Explain how you would address this scenario as an HR professional.

 

HRM 593 DeVry Week 7 Discussion

Employment Law in Action (graded)

Retaliation has been the number one filed EEOC complaint now since 2010, surpassing racial and sexual harassment and discrimination for the first time then, and since then. Often, disciplinary actions result in EEOC filings.

Discipline is an area of Human Resources that can certainly create the potential for legal liability for employers. What are some good guidelines to follow? What are some pitfalls to avoid? How might valid policies be structured and investigations be handled to ensure that retaliation complaints do not result from disciplinary actions?

This section lists options that can be used to view responses.